Celebrating ‘Connecticut Author’s Day’

CTAuthorDaySept1“The State of Connecticut has been and continues to be home to countless talented local authors, from world renowned literary figures including Mark Twain and Harriet Beecher Stowe, to authors that are lesser known but equally deserving of recognition …”

ThaUnexpectedGracet’s Finding Dadan excerpt from the proclamation Gov. Dannel Malloy issued to named today “Connecticut Authors’ Day” in the Nutmeg State.

Celebrations included an invitation-only reception at the Mark Twain House in Hartford featuring best-selling Connecticut authors June Hyjek (also president of the Association of Publishers for Special Sales, Connecticut chapter) and Kara Sundlun (also an Emmy Award-winning journalist), shown at right, and several state officials. More than 60 people attended.

“When you look at the names of those who have lived and created here, from Mark Twain to Dominick Dunne, you see the shaping of America’s culture,” Hyjek said. “While the bold-faced names get most of the attention, this day intends to celebrate all authors who choose to call Connecticut home. Books combat illiteracy. Even if a book doesn’t become a bestseller, it doesn’t mean that it hasn’t added value to someone’s life. Every book is important; every author is important.”

Among the authors with Connecticut connections noted at today’s reception were Pulitzer Prize-winners including A. Scott Berg (Lindbergh), Annie Proulx (The Shipping News) and Bill Dedman (The Color of Money), along with best-sellers Stephanie Meyer (Twilight), Elizabeth Gilbert (Eat, Pray, Love), Jay McInerney (Bright Lights, Big City) and Candace Bushnell (Sex and The City).

How are each of these authors linked to Connecticut?

  • Scott Berg was born in Norwalk
  • Annie Proulx was born in Norwich
  • Bill Dedman lives in Fairfield County
  • Stephanie Meyer and Jay McInerney were born in Hartford
  • Elizabeth Gilbert was born in Waterbury and grew up on a small family Christmas tree farm in Litchfield
  • Candace Bushnell was born and raised in Glastonbury

 

Pretty Baby by Mary Kubica >> one of our book giveaways tonight!

Tomorrow is the release date for Mary Kubica‘s Pretty Baby, follow-up to her debut novel The Good Girl, but we’ll be giving away copies tonight!

Listen to tonight’s Literary New England Radio Show starting at 8 p.m. Our interview with Mary will air at roughly 8:17, and both before and after that conversation, we’ll tell you how to win. In all, we feature three authors and book giveaways on tonight’s show:

3 books 7.27.15Hope you’ll join us! For those who can’t, the good new is that shortly after tonight’s episode ends, it will go into the Literary New England Radio Show archives, where you can listen anytime. Scroll through the archives, and you can access episodes going back to our very first one aired in December 2011.

F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald’s beautiful, gin-filled summer in Connecticut

The Fitzgeralds in front of their Westport house.
The Fitzgeralds in front of their Westport house.

For six months in 1920, F. Scott Fitzgerald and his wife Zelda lived in a rented house at 244 Compo Road South in Westport, Conn., as he wrote his second novel, The Beautiful and Damned. The house is now a private home.

What the "Wakeman Cottage" the Fitzgeralds rented looks like today.
What the “Wakeman Cottage” the Fitzgeralds rented looks like today.

Fitzgerald was 23 at the time, fresh off the success of his debut novel, This Side of Paradise. He and Zelda were newlyweds and known–not always in a good way–for their love of liquor and parties.

At Compo Beach.
At Compo Beach.

Westport, a beacon for artists of all kinds in the 1920s, was a perfect place for the couple. “Summers at Westport, Connecticut, exceeded the riotousness of New York,” said Westport resident and painter Guy Pene du Bois in his 1940 autobiography Artists Say The Silliest Things. “There, gin and orange juice ruled the days and nights. Talk was an extravaganza. Work was an effort made between parties.” And gin was one of the Fitzgeralds’ favorite. In Invented Lives: F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, biographer James Mellow describes their “mad rides along Post Road with abrupt stops at roadhouses to replenish the supply of gin.”

The gin rickey was often their drink of choice. Perhaps a great way to celebrate the lives of this legendary literary couple would be to mix a pitcher and bring it to Westport’s Compo Beach at sunset, followed by a stroll down Compo Road South to see the house that ended up being immortalized in The Beautiful and Damned:

The gray house had been there when women who kept cats were probably witches. … Since those days the house had been bolstered up in a feeble corner, considerably repartitioned and newly plastered inside, amplified by kitchen and added to by a side-porch but, save for where some jovial oaf had roofed the new kitchen with red tin, Colonial it defiantly remained.

FScotthouse_CocktailSome believe Westport also was the actual inspiration for The Great Gatsby, rather than parts of Long Island. Articles in the WestportNow and The New York Times’ Connecticut section explore this possibility, plus include quotes from those who remember the Fitzgeralds during their time in Connecticut. But if gin is still on your mind, hold off on the Gatsby exploration until after you spend a few minutes enjoying this great Open Culture post about Fitzgerald conjugating the verb “to cocktail.” You may want to have a gin rickey in hand.

Hear Dolen Perkins-Valdez, Joseph Finder & Elizabeth Alexander in the Literary New England Radio Show archives

3 booksMiss this past Monday, June 22, Literary New England Radio Show? No worries! You can hear our three enthralling guests in the Literary New England Radio Show archives. The episode features:

  • Dolen Perkins-Valdez on Balm. Set shortly after the end of the Civil War, it’s the story of three people who have come to Chicago in search of a new life: Madge, who was born with magical hands that heal; Sadie, who can talk with the dead; and Hemp, who is searching for both redemption and his missing family.
  • Joseph Finder on The Fixer. The latest stand-alone thriller by this New York Times bestselling author that focuses on a former investigative reporter forced to move back to his childhood home, where he makes an exciting and dangerous discovery about his father’s past.
  • Elizabeth Alexander on The Light of the World. A gorgeous memoir by an acclaimed poet and Pulitzer Prize finalist about the beauty of married life, the trauma of her husband’s death, and the solace found in caring for her two teenage sons.

Was a great episode! Definitely check it out!

Review: Read Jennifer Tseng’s Mayumi, and you’ll be floating in a Sea of Happiness, too

MayumiI have an acute case of Writer Envy. I felt it coming on earlier this month, as I sat in a surprisingly comfortable folding chair at Bunch of Grapes Bookstore in Martha’s Vineyard, Mass., to hear author Jennifer Tseng read from her debut novel Mayumi and the Sea of Happiness (published by the always fabulous Europa Editions).

Jennifer Tseng at bunches of grapesDespite my exhaustion from traveling all day and sleeping little the night before, I found myself leaning forward as she spoke. I couldn’t help it. Her sentences were like Sirens–poetic pathogens made up of words and phrases that lured, serenaded and hummed; that I wanted to get closer to; that wonderfully infected me with pure, unadulterated jealousy: How come I’ve never written anything as gorgeous and compelling as that? I want to! I want to now!

She started the reading at Chapter 1:

It began at the library. While the young man waited quietly to be helped, I stood neatly in thrall to the world outside the window. Momijigari was ending; leaves were falling in drifts like snow. Blackcaps were eating the trees, striking the bark with their beaks then rapidly chewing it, in that annual burlesque of sheer appetite I always found vulgar. When I turned, he cleared his throat and asked for a library card. He explained with darting, downcast eyes that although he’d been coming to the library with his mother since he was a child, he’d never had his own card. There was something in his manner–softness, reverence, a hesitation in the face–this is particular to a son close to his mother. Doesn’t intimacy foster reverence more completely than anything that can be taught? As I handed him the form and then watched as he filled it in–his fingers fumbling a bit with the tiny pencil–I didn’t think of having him yet, I simply gaped at his beauty. I had the thought: he is out of reach, a thought that, had I been younger, might have spurred me on, but in middle age, warned me to retreat.

Like Jennifer, protagonist Mayumi is a 40-something-year-old librarian who lives on a small island remarkably like Martha’s Vineyard. As Kirkus described in its review, Mayumi is also a woman “emotionally marooned in a loveless marriage, clinging for warmth to her 4-year-old daughter, and drifting toward middle age [who] finds unlikely, forbidden love and gasp-inducing passion in the arms of an alluring 17-year-old.”

It’s a complicated love story that, as it unfolds, Mayumi can’t help but compare to Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita. She, after all, is not just a librarian, but a voracious reader and re-reader. Yet Mayumi is no Humbert Humbert. And the relationship Mayumi and the never-named boy develop is nothing if not beautiful, despite the social mores she unapologetically sets aside:

I saw within myself a cup marked complacency and a cup marked disappointment, the contents of both spilling over. I saw that I had been staring impassively for years at the spectacle of my own pain overflowing, as if at a hideous waterfall. Now I turned my gaze toward the young man. … I saw that there was also within me an empty cup marked pleasure and I resolved at once to fill. I refused to be thwarted.

Who of us who’ve reached middle age haven’t felt that kind of longing for fulfillment of desire, whether that desire be for love, sex, the creation of art, the exploration of new places or so many other things? All of us have dreams and desires that are more than just wants. The brave, unconventional and unexpectedly erotic Mayumi shows that while taking risks and going after fulfillment has the potential to end in despair, it can also lead unimaginable happiness, unexpected friendships and unregrettable moments.

Someone said Mayumi and the Sea of Happiness “veers more toward the lyrical than the lurid,” and it’s so true. No one who reads Maymui will be surprised to learn Jennifer is also a poet. Each sentence sings.

Jennifer Tseng at libraryA few days after that Bunch of Grapes event, I had the pleasure of spending part of an afternoon with Jennifer. Despite the rain, we sat on the back porch of the West Tisbury Library as I recorded an interview with her for the Literary New England Radio Show. That conversation will air at 8 pm Monday, July 6. We’ll also give away copies of Mayumi and the Sea of Happiness on that show, so don’t miss tuning in.

If you you’re going to be in Martha’s Vineyard this weekend, you can meet Jennifer in person at 6 pm Saturday, June 27, at the West Tisbury Library. As the flier below shows, the event will feature bubbles, cake, book talk, book signing, Mayumi swag and more.

In the meantime, no matter where you are, pick up a copy of Mayumi. Within a matter of minutes, you’ll be swimming in your own Sea of Happiness. Even for writers susceptible to contracting Writer Envy, this ravishing novel is absolutely worth the risk.

– Cindy Wolfe Boynton

Mayumi library flier

Win Laird Hunt’s Neverhome, now in paperback! Deadline to enter: midnight June 19

“I was strong and he was not, so it was me who went to war to defend the Republic.”

Neverhome, Laird Hunt‘s gorgeous historical novel about a woman who leaves her comfortable home and gentle husband to fight for the North in Civil War, was recently released in paperback. The New York Times called it “enthralling … at once sentimental and aloof [about] a savior and a killer, a folk hero who shuns her own legend, a fierce and wounded woman who finds strength in her troubled past.”

We call Neverhome a must-read and have a copy to give away to you! Here’s how to win it:

The blurb for Neverhome describes protagonist Ash Thompson as a hero, a folk legend, a madwoman and a traitor. Which one of these four things are you? Tell us by Tweeting @LitNewEngland before midnight Friday, June 19, being sure to use the #Neverhome hashtag.

We’ll pick one winner at random out of those who Tweet us, and then announce the name June 20!

lairdhunt1When Neverhome was first released in hardcover, we featured Laird on the Oct. 27, 2014 Literary New England Radio Show, which you can hear in our archives. Other guests that night included Gregory Maguire on Egg & Spoon, Randy Susan Meyers on Accidents of Marriage and Anne Girard on Madame Picasso–such a great show!

Here’s the book trailer for Neverhome, followed by 10 things about the novel and Laird you might want to know. And please … help spread the word about our Neverhome contest!

  1. Laird first got the idea for Neverhome 18 years ago, when he was reading An Uncommon Soldier, a collection of letters by a woman named Sarah Wakeman who disguised herself as a man to fight in the Civil War.
  2. Singapore, San Francisco, London and rural Indiana are among the many places Laird has lived and that have influenced him and his writing.
  3. His grandmother was born on a farm that inspires all the fictional ones he has written about. He poignantly wrote about her, the farm and Neverhome for LitHub.
  4. Neverhome is his sixth novel.
  5. Laird spent a memorable and productive writing residency at New Hampshire’s MacDowell Colony, the oldest arts colony in the United States.
  6. His Twitter feed suggests he dreams a lot.
  7. He has a cat named Mouse.

    Laird Hunt cat
    Laird’s cat, Mouse.
  8. In Neverhome, Ash has no problem learning how to shoot a musket. In fact, her shooting earns the praise of fellow soldiers.
  9. Neverhome is the first of Laird’s novels to be published in the United Kingdom.
  10. The Guardian called Neverhome “a brilliant and breathtaking blaze of a novel, lit the ferocious will and all‑too‑human spirit of its unforgettable narrator.” Wow!